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Dimensional Blondes without ever using lowlights

I had a GREAT question sent to me through the Flourish Facebook page this week from Amy about base breakers and lowlights.  She was asking if base breakers and lowlights would go well together and it hit me that I really should do a post about my anti-low-lighting beliefs.  Now I'm not talking about fun clients who love having lots of different playful colors in their hair.  I'm talking about the vast majority of clients who like to have beautiful, natural hair color.  

I love a beautiful, dimensional blonde, but nothing makes me cringe more than lowlights.  We add hi-lights to our clients hair to give them the beautiful, natural dimension that young children or natural blondes have in their hair.  Once the client has come in for hi-lights 3 or 4 times, they stop looking hi-lighted and start becoming overall lighter which makes the color appear more solid.  So what do stylists do?  They mix in low-lights to bring that dimension back.  As soon as you add in those low-lights, you've lost sight of the initial goal which is to keep the client looking natural and dimensional.  Never would the sun create 3 colors naturally in your hair, but that is just what you've done since you client has a base, hi lights and lowlights which are often 3 different tones.  I call this hair confetti and I have seen a lot of clients come in for re-dos when they feel that their stylist has over low-lighted them.  

Let me show you what I mean.  These pictures were created using hi-lights and low-lights:

Now, these blondes were created using hi lights and a glaze in between the foils:

Do you notice how the pictures that include hi-lighted and low-lighted hair don't look as natural? Both sets are very dimensional, but the pictures with low-lights look more artificial and less of the beachy blonde that many clients are looking for.

Instead of low-lighting, I save myself the time and trouble of weaving in a million foils by just hi-lighting as normal and formulating a light glaze that I apply between the foils and allow to process at the same time. When you go to wash out the hi-lights, you'll now have created a gorgeous, dimensional blonde without creating confetti colored hair.  I always use Shades EQ for my glaze, but any demi-permanent will do the trick.  

Here are some formulation examples:

NICOLE RICHIE AS PICTURED ABOVE

Assuming client comes in with 1.5" natural root at a cool level 6 and pre-hilighted ends.  I would hi-light with Redken Blonde Icing Gold bleach with 30 volume pro-oxide.  I would foil about 20 foils with 3 foils in the front of each ear and the remaining 12-15 along her part.  Once I was done foiling, I would apply a glaze of 2 oz 09gb and 1/2oz 07gb from roots to ends and allow to process.  Rise and style as usual for natural lowlights.

JENNIFER ANISTON AS PICTURED ABOVE

Her hair to me seems less hi lighted overall with just pops of blonde.  Her overall result looks cooler to me as well so I formulated the glaze a bit cooler. Assuming client comes in with 1.5" natural root at a cool level 7 and pre-hilighted ends.  I would hi-light with Redken Blonde Icing Gold bleach with 30 volume pro-oxide.  I would foil about 15 foils with 3 foils in the front of each ear and the remaining 10-12 along her part.  Once I was done foiling, I would apply a glaze of 1 oz 09n 1/2oz 09gb and 1/2oz 07gb from roots to ends and allow to process.  Rise and style as usual for natural lowlights.

Try this on a doll head and see what you think.  It will save you much work and time and leave you client with gorgeous,natural dimension.  Let me know how it goes XOXO